Our friend Ron Feinberg spent forty years as a professional journalist, thirty of those years with the AJC.  Following is a post from recent travels with his wonderful wife Wendy….enjoy!

Some folks stay busy in retirement traveling … here’s how a few friends spent their winter vacation…..

New York, New York, it’s a helluva town …  On the Town

So yet again the lovely Miss Wendy and I were in the Big Apple last week, enjoying the sights, sounds and, yes, even the frigid weather. Hey, it’s the one time each year that I have the opportunity to wear a really heavy coat, a scarf and gloves. Cover up just right, and even when it’s sleeting, you just might manage to feel toasty and warm while looking cool in water-resistant basic black!

And so it was that Wendy and I found ourselves high up in the balcony of the Lyric Theatre on 42nd Street, waiting out the final minutes before the curtain went up for “On the Town,” a glorious revival of the happening musical that first hit Broadway during the waning days of World War II.

Those of us of a certain generation will recall the movie version of the show, starring Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly and Jules Munshin; focusing on the ups, downs and conquests of a trio of sailors on a 24-hour leave in the Big Apple.

Wendy and I had, in fact, been in the city for several days and, in a fashion, had been playing out the touristy bits of the show; making it uptown and down, even riding in a “hole in the ground”, living out the frenetic tone set in the show’s signature number:

New York, New York, a visitor’s place,
Where no one lives on account of the pace,
But seven millions are screaming for space.
New York, New York, it’s a visitor’s place!

Indeed, a visitor’s place! Have I mentioned the food?

Wendy and I once again managed to eat our way across Manhattan, adding a few new and nicer restaurants — Le Marais, a kosher steakhouse in midtown and Rafale, an Italian ristorante in the village — to our usual stops at delis offering up a smorgasbord of Jewish delights: matzo ball soup and mushroom barley; corned beef and pastrami; chopped liver, lox and bagels; knishes, kugel and kasha varnishkes! If you have to ask, well, let’s just say kasha is a Jewish delicacy and leave it at that!

Now pass the Rolaids or, better yet, Bromo-Seltzer!

Somewhere deep in our gluttony, we managed to push back our dinner plates and make it to several Broadway musicals. Aside from “On the Town,” we tapped our tootsies at “Wicked” and “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder”.

What lingers about most when thinking of these two shows is the final number in “Wicked” leading into intermission, “Defying Gravity”. As some of you may recall, Elphaba, the lovely and talented Caroline Bowman, tells us that it’s time for her to trust her instincts and “leap,” time to defy gravity.

And, wow, does she soar, high above the stage and audience. It’s one of those transcendent moments in theater when most everything — the music, singing, lights and special effects — blend together splendidly, offering up a fantasy that momentarily springs to life.

Another such moment took hold at the Lyric Theater, seconds after the lights dimmed but a moment before the curtain went up for “On the Town.” As I mentioned earlier, Wendy and I were high above the stage, surrounded by tourists and locals, folks from around the world and down the block; all of us settling in for a little fun and frothy entertainment.

The front of the stage was covered with an American flag, a huge piece of artwork that I thought in some fashion might be linked to the red, white and blue vibe of the show — you know, sailors out and about in search of fun and romance!

With little fanfare, the full orchestra began playing the national anthem — yes, the U.S. National Anthem! I looked about, a bit puzzled, and spotted folks around me looking around, confused and uncertain how to react. Was this part of the show? Should we stand?

One by one, then row after row, people began rising, then singing. The orchestra played with gusto and, taken with it all, the audience responded. After only a moment, the Star Spangled Banner filled the theater, the acoustics catching the lyrics and tossing them about, a chilling spectacle that built on itself. The final words, “land of the free … and the home of the brave,” hung lightly in the air as the room went absolutely quiet, then burst into spontaneous cheers.

The flag lifted, the show began and five minutes into the production we were lost in the music and lyrics of  Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden and Adolph Green as we learned that “the Bronx is up, but the Battery’s down … people ride in a hole in the ground … New York, New York … it’s a helluva town.”

And so it is!

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2 thoughts on “Guest Blog From Ron Feinberg

  1. There, you did it! This now what my email looked like as opposed to giving me the entire blogpost! Have a great day.

    From: Retirement = Re-Energizing Life Reply-To: Retirement = Re-Energizing Life Date: Thursday, January 22, 2015 8:56 AM To: eve Subject: [New post] Guest Blog From Ron Feinberg

    WordPress.com pleafman posted: “Our friend Ron Feinberg spent forty years as a professional journalist, thirty of those years with the AJC. Following is a post from recent travels with his wonderful wife Wendy….enjoy! Some folks stay busy in retirement traveling … here’s how a f”

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  2. Enjoyed reading Ron and Wendy’s experience in New York. Looks like I will need to make another trip to see On The Town with Cody Wiiliams and Alysha Umphress…two young and upcoming performers!

    Like

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